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Markets

World stocks clamber off 18-month lows, but markets on recession watch

 

  • S&P futures up 1.13%, European stocks gain 0.96%
  • MSCI Asia ex-Japan +1.8%, Nikkei +2.64%
  • Worries over inflation, tightening policy remain
  • Dollar hovers near 20-year highs on safe-haven demand

LONDON/SHANGHAI, May 13 (Reuters) – World stocks rose from the previous day’s 18-month lows and the dollar pulled back from 20-year highs on Friday, though investors remained nervous about high inflation and the impact of rising interest rates.

Markets are becoming anxious about the possibility of recession, with the S&P getting close to a bear market on Thursday, at nearly 20% off its January all-time high.

In an interview late on Thursday, US Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell said the battle to control inflation would “include some pain.” Powell repeated his expectation of half-percentage-point interest rate rises at each of the Fed’s next two policy meetings, while pleading that “we’re prepared to do more.” read more

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The war in Ukraine has aggravated supply chain disruptions and inflationary pressures already in place after more than two years of the COVID-19 pandemic, but stocks enjoyed a bounce on Friday.

“There’s an awful lot of negative sentiment out there, we’re looking at a 40% chance of recession,” said Patrick Spencer, vice chairman of equities at Baird Investment Bank.

“A lot of fund managers have cut their equity allocations and raised cash, though we think this is a correction rather than a bear market.”

MSCI’s world equity index (.MIWD00000PUS) rose 0.32% after hitting its lowest since November 2020 on Thursday, though it was heading for a 4% fall on the week, its sixth straight week of losses.

S&P futures bounced 1.13% after the S&P index dropped 0.13% overnight, with the index also eyeing a sixth straight week of declines.

S&P 500 set for a sixth straight week of falls

European stocks (.STOXX) rallied 0.96% and Britain’s FTSE 100 (.FTSE) gained 1.17%.

The US dollar eased 0.22% to 104.54 against a basket of currencies, but remained close to 20-year highs due to safe haven demand.

Russia has bristled over Finland’s plan to apply for NATO membership, with Sweden potentially following suit.

Moscow called Finland’s announcement hostile and threatened retaliation, including unspecified “military-technical” measures. read more

The dollar rose 0.36% to 128.76 yen , while the euro gained 0.3% to $1.0408, recovering from Thursday’s five-year lows.

Cryptocurrency bitcoin also turned higher, cracking through $30,000 after the collapse of TerraUSD, a so-called stablecoin, drove it to a 16-month low of around $25,400 on Thursday. read more

“Some traders may see the sharp fall this month as an opportunity to buy the dip, but given the hugely volatile nature of the coins, the crypto house of cards could tumble further,” said Susannah Streeter, senior investment and markets analyst at Hargreaves Lansdown .

The moves higher in equities were mirrored in US Treasuries, with the benchmark US 10-year yield edging up to 2.9221% from a close of 2.817% on Thursday.

The policy-sensitive 2-year yield was at 2.6006%, up from a close of 2.522%.

“Within the shape of the US Treasury curve we are not seeing any particularly fresh recession/slowdown signal, just the same consistent marked slowing earmarked for H2 2023,” Alan Ruskin, macro strategist at Deutsche Bank, said in a note.

German 10-year government bond yields edged up to 0.9250%.

MSCI’s broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan (.MIAPJ0000PUS) was up almost 2% from Thursday’s 22-month closing low, trimming its losses for the week to less than 3%.

Australian shares (.AXJO) gained 1.93%, while Japan’s Nikkei stock index (.N225) jumped 2.64%.

In China, the blue-chip CSI300 index (.CSI300) was up 0.75% and Hong Kong’s Hang Seng (.HSI) rose 2.71%, encouraged by comments from Shangahi’s deputy mayor that the city may be able to start easing some tough COVID restrictions this month. read more

“We had some pretty big moves yesterday, and when you see those big moves it’s only natural to get some retracement, especially since it’s Friday heading into the weekend. There’s not really a new narrative that’s come through,” said Matt Simpson, senior market analyst at City Index.

Oil prices were higher against the backdrop of a pending European Union ban on Russian oil, but were still set for their first weekly loss in three weeks, hit by concerns about inflation and China’s lockdowns slowing global growth.

US crude rose 0.75% to $106.97 a barrel, and global benchmark Brent crude was up 1.05% at $108.58 per barrel.

Spot gold , which had been driven to a three-month low by the soaring dollar, was up 0.2% at $1,824.61 per ounce.

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Reporting by Andrew Galbraith; Editing by Simon Cameron-Moore, Lincoln Feast and Kim Coghill

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Business

Siemens to leave Russia due to Ukraine war, take hefty charge

  • Siemens to leave Russia after 170 years
  • Russia makes up around 1% of total revenues
  • Shares fall after earnings miss
  • CEO condemns the war in Ukraine

ZURICH, May 12 (Reuters) – Siemens (SIEGn.DE) will quit the Russian market due to the war in Ukraine, it said on Thursday, taking a 600 million euro ($630 million) hit to its business during the second quarter, with more costs to eat.

The German industrial and technology group became the latest multinational to announce losses linked to its decision to leave Russia following the Feb. 24 invasion, which Moscow calls a “special military operation”.

Several companies, from brewers Anheuser-Busch InBev (ABI.BR) and Carlsberg to sportswear maker Adidas (ADSGn.DE), carmaker Renault and several banks have been counting the cost of suspending operations in or withdrawing from Russia. read more

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Siemens Chief Executive Roland Busch described the conflict as a “turning point in history.”

“We, as a company, have clearly and strongly condemned this war,” Busch told reporters.

“We’re all moved by the war as human beings. And financial figures must take a back seat in the face of the tragedy. Nevertheless, like many other companies, we’re feeling the impact on our business.”

During the second quarter Siemens incurred 600 million euros in impairment and other charges mostly recorded in its train-making mobility business subsequent to sanctions on Russia, Siemens said.

Busch said further impacts were to be expected, mainly from non-cash charges related to the winding-down of legal entities, revaluation of financial assets and restructuring costs.

“From today’s perspective, we foresee further potential risks for net income in the low- to mid-triple-digit million range, although we can’t define an exact timeframe,” he added.

Siemens shares dropped 5% in early trading as the company missed analysts’ expectations for second-quarter profit.

The Munich company employs 3,000 people in Russia, where it has been active for 170 years. It first went to Russia in 1851 to deliver devices for the telegraph line between Moscow and St Petersburg.

The country now contributes about 1% of Siemens’ annual revenue, with most of the present day business concerned with maintenance and service work on high-speed trains.

Its sites in Moscow and St Petersburg are now being ramped down, Busch said.

The costs weighed on Siemens’ second quarter earnings, with net income halved to 1.21 billion euros ($1.27 billion), missing analysts’ forecasts of 1.73 billion.

The company posted industrial profit of 1.78 billion euros, down 13% from a year earlier and also missing forecasts.

But demand stayed robust, with orders 22% higher on a comparable basis and revenue 7% higher.

As a result it confirmed its full-year outlook, with comparable revenue growth of 6% to 8% for the full year, with a downturn in mobility expected to be compensated by faster growth in factory automation and digital buildings.

JP Morgan analyst Andreas Willi described the results as “mixed with strong orders, industry leading growth in automation and strong cash conversion.”

($1=0.9508 euros)

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Reporting by John Revill; Editing by Kim Coghill and Clarence Fernandez

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Categories
Business

Stocks in a tailspin, dollar soars as hard landing fears grow

A broker reacts while trading at his computer terminal at a stock brokerage firm in Mumbai, India, February 1, 2020. REUTERS/Francis Mascarenhas

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  • World stocks drop to 1-1/2 yr low, down almost 20% YTD
  • Europe opens down 2% US equity futures struggle
  • Dollar hits 2yr highs on AUD, NZD
  • Bitcoin tumbling, hits new 16-month low
  • Copper buckles to lowest since October

LONDON, May 12 (Reuters) – Shares sank to a 1-1/2 year low on Thursday and the dollar hit its highest in two decades, as fears grew that fast-rising inflation will drive a sharp rise in interest rates that brings the global economy to a standstill.

Those nerves and the still-escalating war in Ukraine took Europe’s main markets down more than 2% in early trade and left MSCI’s top index of world shares (.MIWD00000PUS) at its lowest since late 2020 and down nearly 20% for the year.

The global growth-sensitive Australian and New Zealand dollars fell about 0.8% to almost two-year lows. The Chinese yuan slid to a 19-month trough while the dollar powered to its highest level since late 2002.

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Nearly all the main volatility gauges were signaling danger. Bitcoin was caught in the fire-sale of risky crypto assets as it fell another 8% to $26,570, having been near $40,000 just a week ago and almost $70,000 just last November.

“We have had big moves,” UBS’s UK Chief Investment Officer Caroline Simmons, said referring as well to bond markets and economic expectations. “And when the market falls it does tend to fall quite fast.”

Data on Wednesday had shown US inflation running persistently hot. Headline consumer prices rose 8.3% in April year-on-year, fractionally slower than the 8.5% pace of March, but still above economists’ forecasts for 8.1%. read more

US markets had whipsawed after the news, closing sharply lower, and futures prices were pointing to another round of 0.2%-0.7% falls for the S&P 500, Nasdaq and Dow Jones Industrial later.

“We’re now very much embedded with at least two further (US) hikes of 50 basis points on the agenda,” said Damian Rooney, director of institutional sales at Argonaut in Perth.

“I think we were probably delusional six months ago with the rise of US equities on hopes and prayers and the madness of the meme stocks,” he added.

MSCI’s broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan (.MIAPJ0000PUS) fell 2.3% to a 22-month low overnight. Japan’s Nikkei (.N225) fell 1.8%.

Treasuries were bid in both Europe and Asia, especially at the long end, flattening the yield curve as investors braced for near-term hikes to hurt long-run growth – an outcome that would most likely slow or even reverse rate hikes.

The benchmark 10-year Treasury yield had dropped in the US and fell a further 7 bps to 2.8569% on Thursday. The gap between the highly rate-rise sensitive two-year yields and 10-year ones narrowed 4.2 bps .

In Europe, Germany’s 10-year yield, the benchmark for the bloc, fell as much as 12 bps to 0.875%, its lowest in nearly two weeks.

“I think a lot of it is catch up from what happened yesterday, and also there’s still a lot of negative sentiment in the US Treasury curve,” said Lyn Graham-Taylor, senior rates strategist at Rabobank.

SELL IN MAY

The rates outlook is driving up the US dollar and taking the heaviest toll on riskier assets that shot up through two years of stimulus and low-rate lending.

The Nasdaq (.IXIC) is down nearly 8% in May so far and more than 25% this year. Hong Kong’s Hang Seng Tech index (.HSTECH) slid 1.5% on Thursday and is off more than 30% this year.

Cryptocurrency markets are also melting down, with the collapse of the so-called TerraUSD stablecoin highlighting the turmoil as well as the selling in bitcoin and next-biggest-crypto, ether. read more

A weakening growth picture outside the United States is battering investor confidence, too, as war in Ukraine threatens an energy crisis in Europe and lengthening COVID-19 lockdowns in China throw another spanner into supply chain chaos.

Nomura estimated this week that 41 Chinese cities are in full or partial lockdowns, making up 30% of the country’s GDP.

Heavyweight property developer Sunac (1918.HK) said it missed a bond interest payment and will miss more as China’s real estate sector remains in the grip of a credit crunch. read more

The yuan fell to a 19-month low of 6.7631 and has dropped almost 6% in under a month.

The Australian dollar fell 0.8% to a near two-year low of $0.6879. The kiwi slid by a similar margin to $0.6240, though the euro and yen held steady to keep the dollar index just shy of a two-decade peak.

Sterling was at a two-year low of just under $1.22 as well as economic data there caused worries and concerns grew that Britain’s Brexit deal with the EU was in danger of unraveling again due to the same old problem of Northern Ireland’s border. read more

In commodity trade, oil wound back a bit of Wednesday’s surge on growth worries.

Brent crude futures fell 2.3% to $104.93 a barrel, while highly growth-sensitive metals copper and tin slumped over 3.5% and 9% respectively. That marked copper’s lowest level since October.

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Additional reporting by Tom Westbrook in Singapore; Editing by Kim Coghill

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Categories
Business

EXCLUSIVE Google paying more than 300 EU publishers for news, more to come

BRUSSELS, May 11 (Reuters) – Alphabet (GOOGL.O) unit Google has signed deals to pay more than 300 publishers in Germany, France and four other EU countries for their news and will roll out a tool to make it easier for others to sign up too, the company told Reuters.

The move to be announced publicly later on Wednesday followed the adoption of landmark EU copyright rules three years ago that require Google and other online platforms to pay musicians, performers, authors, news publishers and journalists for using their work.

News publishers, among Google’s fiercest critics, have long urged governments to ensure online platforms pay fair remuneration for their content. Australia last year made such payments mandatory while Canada introduced similar legislation last month. read more

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“So far, we have agreements which cover more than 300 national, local and specialist news publications in Germany, Hungary, France, Austria, the Netherlands and Ireland, with many more discussions ongoing,” Sulina Connal, director for news and publishing partnerships, said in blogpost seen by Reuters and expected to be published later on Wednesday. The blog did not say how much publishers were being paid.

Two-thirds of this group are German publishers including Der Spiegel, Die Zeit and Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung.

“We are now announcing the launch of a new tool to make offers to thousands more news publishers, starting in Germany and Hungary, and rolling out to other EU countries over the coming months,” Connal said in the blogpost.

The tool offers publishers an extended news preview agreement that allows Google to show snippets and thumbnails for a licensing fee.

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Reporting by Foo Yun Chee; Editing by Lisa Shumaker

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Categories
Business

Wall Street dips while treasury yields, oil prices drop

NEW YORK, May 10 (Reuters) – Wall Street stocks turned lower in a volatile session and oil prices fell on Tuesday with risk appetite appearing to falter as investors turned to safe havens such as Treasuries amid fears about inflation and slowing economic growth.

US Treasuries rallied, with the yield on the benchmark 10-year note tumbling from more than a three-year high to below 3% as the market reassessed the inflation outlook a day before US consumer price index (CPI) data is released.

Markets have been volatile due to a combination of surging inflation and fears that monetary tightening aimed at slowing price increases would also cause a slowdown in economic growth.

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Last week central banks in the United States, Britain and Australia raised interest rates and investors girded for more tightening as policymakers fought soaring inflation.

While all three US indexes were rebounding from Monday’s sell-off, enthusiasm for equities quickly faded.

“There’s a tonne of cross currents right now. Liquidity is drying up and volatility is the name of the game,” said Matthew Miskin, co-chief investment strategist at John Hancock Investment Management in Boston.

“The tech and growth side of the (equities) market is such a big weight. Treasury yields going up as fast as they did spooked risk assets. If they could take a breather here it could let the market … find some footing. “

Miskin was reassured by Federal Reserve official comments on Tuesday that suggested efforts to engineer a soft landing. In particular he pointed to Cleveland Federal Reserve Bank President Loretta Mester’s comment that while unemployment may increase and growth slow, the Fed’s policy tightening should not push the economy into a “sustained downturn.” read more

“They’ve been so hawkish so any slight move off that the market wants to sniff that out,” said Miskin. “Sentiment wise a lot of people are looking for capitulation. The dots aren’t completely connecting yet for that.”

At 1130 EDT (1530 GMT), the Dow Jones Industrial Average (.DJI) fell 97.45 points, or 0.3%, to 32,148.25, the S&P 500 (.SPX) lost 10.91 points, or 0.27%, to 3,980.33 and the Nasdaq Composite ( .IXIC) dropped 16.49 points, or 0.14%, to 11,606.76.

The pan-European STOXX 600 index (.STOXX) rose 0.80% and MSCI’s gauge of stocks across the globe (.MIWD00000PUS) shed 0.33%, after earlier rising as much as 1.44%.

The US dollar was choppy on Tuesday as it held near a two-decade high ahead of a key reading on inflation that could provide insight on the Fed policy path. read more

The dollar index rose 0.164%, with the euro down 0.19% to $1.0535. The Japanese yen weakened 0.03% versus the greenback at 130.29 per dollar, while Sterling was last trading at $1.2301, down 0.24% on the day.

Earlier data showed China’s export growth slowed to its weakest in almost two years, as the central bank pledged to step up support for the slowing economy. read more

Oil prices fell in volatile trade as the market balanced impending European Union sanctions on Russian oil with demand concerns related to coronavirus lockdowns in China, a strong dollar and growing recession risks.

US crude recently fell 1.85% to $101.18 per barrel and Brent was at $103.92, down 1.91% on the day.

Benchmark 10-year notes last rose 33/32 in price to yield 2.9497%, from 3.079% late on Monday.

Spot gold dropped 0.4% to $1,847.41 an ounce. US gold futures % to $1,857.10 an ounce.

Elsewhere, Bitcoin was up 4% after earlier falling to its lowest level since July 2021. Tuesday’s gain allowed it to recover some losses when it tumbled 11.8% on Monday plunge, which had been its biggest daily fall since May 2021 . read more

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Additional reporting by Herbert Lash and Chuck Mikolajczak in New York, Elizabeth Howcroft in London; Editing by Bradley Perrett, Raissa Kasolowsky and Alexander Smith

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